New York State Prepares

Hello EV drivers! As you all know, California, Georgia, and Hawaii have all embraced the growing plug-in vehicle market. But did you know that New York wants to put more electric vehicles on its roads, too? New York State is aware of the electric future, and does not want to lag behind. So far, it has coupled electric vehicles to its OneNYC plan and ChargeNY initiative to work toward achieving its primary goal of becoming the most sustainable big city in the world.

 

This is a lofty goal, but New York is up for the challenge. It will succeed by taking little steps at a time. The OneNYC plan is one of those steps, and it is made up of four visions: “Growth”, “Equity”, “Sustainability”, and “Resilience”. The combined goal of these plans is to reduce the state’s carbon emissions by 80% as compared to 2005. New York State is well on its way to achieving this goal; in 2014 alone, it decreased its carbon footprint by 20%. It achieved this through proper legislation, awareness of climate change, and investing in NYSERDA, the New York State Department of Energy & Research Development.

 

The “Sustainability” vision includes programs to accommodate new and current EV drivers. It outlines the steps New York State will take to bring the electric vehicle market inside its borders. Following the example of other states like California and Georgia, New York has implemented a rebate program for auto dealers, a $2000 rebate for buyers, and a 10% discount on EZ passes. On Earth Day, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that by 2025 the New York City fleet will have 2000 electric vehicles. Currently, the city fleet has 1000 EV sedans, so it’s already halfway to achieving this goal… but that’s not the exciting part. New York State has partnered with the energy company Con Edison, which will invest $25 million in innovative strategy and infrastructure. 

 

Through this partnership, New York wants to provide public street chargers to help electric vehicle drivers stay active with their charge habits. By supplying continuous access to the power drivers need for daily routines, Con Edison hopes that this will reduce pressure on the grid. This way, high load usage from chargers will be done during off-peak hours. 

 

Out-of-state EV drivers will not fully understand the benefit of this initiative, so let me explain. The majority of New York City residents do not own a driveway, and not many pay a monthly fee to leave their car in a parking lot overnight. This is a monumental public service to the large population that resides in New York City. And if that wasn’t enough, the state also wants employers to install chargers at workplaces through a program called Charge to Work. It works by offering employers incentives if they provide charging stations for their employers. 

 

The other big step toward making New York the world’s most sustainable city is Governor Cuomo’s ChargeNY initiative, which will bring 3000 EV charging stations to the state by 2018. By creating a robust network of chargers, it will prepare the state for the forecasted 1 million electric vehicles that will be on the roads by 2025. If you aren’t from the state and have been planning a road trip to the Big Apple, you will be pleased to know that you’ll have a charge. If you own an electric vehicle in New York, the state will help you take your car out on those long drives you’ve been dreaming about and you can wave range anxiety, and charge anxiety, goodbye.

 

I am very excited to be alive and experience the changes New York is making to provide its residents with quiet roads, zero waste, cleaner air, and less pollution.

 

If you want to read more about the OneNYC plan, click here, you can visit NYSERDA by clicking here, if you are ready to plug-in, this website will give you the information if you qualify for the Electric Car rebate.

Georgia’s Appalachian past illuminates our EV future

There’s a perception, correct or not, that EV drivers are a certain kind of person.  Perhaps a person with certain kinds of disposable income and certain political views.  Maybe you associate that person with the people around my office in Ponce City Market in Atlanta.  So let’s get out of there and away from that stereotype.  In fact, let’s go all the way up 85 and 985 and then a ways up 441 to Clayton, Georgia.

Charge Anxiety vs. Range Anxiety

Charge Anxiety vs. Range Anxiety

The EV market is growing, but there are not enough chargers to serve the market. So what does this mean for EV drivers? Well, there are two primary pain points that come up. We like to call them ‘range anxiety’ and ‘charge anxiety.’ You can call them whatever you want, but at the end of the day, it is inhibiting the EV market.